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 Republic of the Congo
 
Flag of Republic of Congo is divided diagonally from the lower hoist side by a yellow band; the upper triangle on hoist side is green and the lower triangle is red.

PROFILE

OFFICIAL NAME:
Republic of the Congo

Geography Map of Congo, Republic of the
Area: 342,000 sq. km (132,000 sq. mi.); slightly larger than New Mexico. 
Cities: Capital--Brazzaville (pop. 800,000). Other cities--Pointe-Noire (450,000), Dolisie (150,000). 
Climate: Tropical. Tropical jungle in the North (country seasonally split--half lies above the Equator; half below the Equator). 
Terrain: Coastal plains, fertile valleys, central plateau, forested flood plains.

People 
Nationality: Noun and adjective--Congolese (sing. and pl.). 
Population (July 2007 est.): 3,610,000. 
Annual growth rate (2007 est.): 2.639%. 
Ethnic groups: 15 principal Bantu groups; more than 70 subgroups. Largest groups are Bacongo, Vili, Bateke, M'Bochi, and Sangha. Also present is a small population (less than 100,000) of Pygmies, ethnically unrelated to the Bantu majority. 
Religions: Traditional beliefs 50%, Roman Catholic 35%, other Christian 15%, Muslim 2%. 
Languages: French (official), Lingala and Munukutuba (national). 
Health: Infant mortality rate (2007 est.)--83.26 deaths/1,000 live births. Life expectancy (2007 est.)--53.29 yrs.
Work force: About 40% of population, two-thirds of whom work in agriculture.

Government 
Type: Republic. 
Independence: August 15, 1960. 
Constitution: New constitution adopted in nationwide referendum on January 20, 2002. 
Branches: Executive--president (chief of state), Council of Ministers (cabinet). Legislative--bicameral legislature made up of a Senate and a National Assembly. Judicial--Supreme Court, Court of Accounts and Budgetary Discipline, Courts of Appeal (Title VIII of the 2002 constitution), and the Constitutional Court (Title IX of the 2002 constitution). Other--Economic Council and Human Rights Commission.
Administrative subdivisions: 10 departments, divided into districts, plus the capital district. 
Political parties: More than 100 new parties formed (but not all function) since multi-party democracy was introduced in 1990. The largest are the Pan-African Union for Social Democracy (UPADS), Congolese Labor Party (PCT), Congolese Movement for Democracy and Integral Development (MCDDI), Coalition for Democracy and Social Progress (RDPS), Coalition for Democracy and Development (RDD), Union of Democratic Forces (UFD), Union of Democratic Renewal (URD), Union for Development and Social Progress (UDPS). Following the June-October 1997 war and the 1998-99 civil conflict, many parties, including UPADS and MCDDI, were left in disarray as their leadership fled the country. By 2007, many of the leaders had returned, with the notable exception of former President Pascal Lissouba. 
Suffrage: Universal adult.

Economy 
GDP (2007 est.): $7.6574 billion. 
Real GDP growth rate (2007 est.): -1.6%. 
Per capita income (2007 est.): $2,159.
Inflation (2007 est.): 2.6%.
Natural resources: Petroleum, wood, potash, lead, zinc, uranium, phosphates, natural gas, hydropower. 
Structure of production (2001): Government and services--40.3%; petroleum sector--38.9%; agriculture and forestry--10.5%; utilities and industry--6.0%; other--4.3%. 
Agriculture: Products--manioc, sugar, rice, corn, peanuts, vegetables, coffee, cocoa, forest products. Land--less than 2% cultivated. 
Trade (2006 est.): Exports--$5.996 billion (f.o.b.): petroleum (89% of export earnings), lumber, plywood, sugar, cocoa, coffee, diamonds. Exports to the U.S. (2007 est.)--$3.099 billion. Imports--$1.964 billion (f.o.b.): capital equipment, construction materials, foodstuffs. Imports from the U.S. (2007 est.)--$140 million.

PEOPLE
Congo's sparse population is concentrated in the southwestern portion of the country, leaving the vast areas of tropical jungle in the north virtually uninhabited. Thus, Congo is one of the most urbanized countries in Africa, with 70% of its total population living in Brazzaville, Pointe-Noire, or along the 332-mile railway that connects them. In southern rural areas, industrial and commercial activity suffered as a consequence of the civil wars in the late 1990s. Except in Kouilou province and Pointe Noire, commercial activity other than subsistence activity came nearly to a halt. A slow recovery began in 2000 and continues in 2008.

Before the 1997 war, about 9,000 Europeans and other non-Africans lived in Congo, most of whom were French. Only a fraction of this number remains. The number of American citizens residing in Congo typically hovers around 100.

HISTORY 
First inhabited by Pygmies, Congo was later settled by Bantu groups that also occupied parts of present-day Angola, Gabon, and Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire), forming the basis for ethnic affinities and rivalries among those states. Several Bantu kingdoms--notably those of the Kongo, the Loango, and the Teke--built trade links leading into the Congo River basin. The first European contacts came in the late 15th century, and commercial relationships were quickly established with the kingdoms--trading for slaves captured in the interior. The coastal area was a major source for the transatlantic slave trade, and when that commerce ended in the early 19th century, the power of the Bantu kingdoms eroded.

The area came under French sovereignty in the 1880s. Pierre Savorgnon de Brazza, a French empire builder, competed with agents of Belgian King Leopold's International Congo Association (later Zaire) for control of the Congo River basin. Between 1882 and 1891, treaties were secured with all the main local rulers on the river's right bank, placing their lands under French protection. In 1908, France organized French Equatorial Africa (AEF), comprising its colonies of Middle Congo (modern Congo), Gabon, Chad, and Oubangui-Chari (modern Central African Republic). Brazzaville was selected as the federal capital.

Economic development during the first 50 years of colonial rule in Congo centered on natural resource extraction by private companies. In 1924-34, the Congo-Ocean Railway (CFCO) was built at a considerable human and financial cost, opening the way for growth of the ocean port of Pointe-Noire and towns along its route.

During World War II, the AEF administration sided with Charles DeGaulle, and Brazzaville became the symbolic capital of Free France during 1940-43. The Brazzaville Conference of 1944 heralded a period of major reform in French colonial policy, including the abolition of forced labor, granting of French citizenship to colonial subjects, decentralization of certain powers, and election of local advisory assemblies. Congo benefited from the postwar expansion of colonial administrative and infrastructure spending as a result of its central geographic location within AEF and the federal capital at Brazzaville.

The Loi Cadre (framework law) of 1956 ended dual voting roles and provided for partial self-government for the individual overseas territories. Ethnic rivalries then produced sharp struggles among the emerging Congolese political parties and sparked severe riots in Brazzaville in 1959. After the September 1958 referendum approving the new French Constitution, AEF was dissolved. Its four territories became autonomous members of the French Community, and Middle Congo was renamed the Congo Republic. Formal independence was granted in August 1960.

Congo's first President was Fulbert Youlou, a former Catholic priest from the Pool region in the southeast. He rose to political prominence after 1956, and was narrowly elected President by the National Assembly at independence. Youlou's 3 years in power were marked by ethnic tensions and political rivalry. In August 1963, Youlou was overthrown in a 3-day popular uprising (Les Trois Glorieuses) led by labor elements and joined by rival political parties. All members of the Youlou government were arrested or removed from office. The Congolese military took charge of the country briefly and installed a civilian provisional government headed by Alphonse Massamba-Debat. Under the 1963 constitution, Massamba-Debat was elected President for a 5-year term and named Pascal Lissouba to serve as Prime Minister. However, President Massamba-Debat's term ended abruptly in August 1968, when Capt. Marien Ngouabi and other army officers toppled the government in a coup. After a period of consolidation under the newly formed National Revolutionary Council, Major Ngouabi assumed the presidency on December 31, 1968. One year later, President Ngouabi proclaimed Congo to be Africa's first "people's republic" and announced the decision of the National Revolutionary Movement to change its name to the Congolese Labor Party (PCT).

On March 18, 1977, President Ngouabi was assassinated. Although the persons accused of shooting Ngouabi were tried and some of them executed, the motivation behind the assassination is still not clear. An 11-member Military Committee of the Party (CMP) was named to head an interim government with Colonel (later General) Joachim Yhomby-Opango to serve as President of the Republic. Accused of corruption and deviation from party directives, Yhomby-Opango was removed from office on February 5, 1979, by the Central Committee of the PCT, which then simultaneously designated Vice President and Defense Minister Col. Denis Sassou-Nguesso as interim President. The Central Committee directed Sassou-Nguesso to take charge of preparations for the Third Extraordinary Congress of the PCT, which proceeded to elect him President of the Central Committee and President of the Republic. Under a congressional resolution, Yhomby-Opango was stripped of all powers, rank, and possessions and placed under arrest to await trial for high treason. He was released from house arrest in late 1984 and ordered back to his native village of Owando.

After two decades of turbulent politics bolstered by Marxist-Leninist rhetoric, and with the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Congolese gradually moderated their economic and political views to the point that, in 1992, Congo completed a transition to multi-party democracy. Ending a long history of one-party Marxist rule, a specific agenda for this transition was laid out during Congo's national conference of 1991 and culminated in August 1992 with multi-party presidential elections. Sassou-Nguesso conceded defeat and Congo's new President, Prof. Pascal Lissouba, was inaugurated on August 31, 1992.

Congolese democracy experienced severe trials in 1993 and early 1994. President Lissouba dissolved the National Assembly in November 1992, calling for new elections in May 1993. The results of those elections were disputed, touching off violent civil unrest in June and again in November. In February 1994, all parties accepted the decisions of an international board of arbiters, and the risk of large-scale insurrection subsided.

However, Congo's democratic progress was derailed in 1997. As presidential elections scheduled for July 1997 approached, tensions between the Lissouba and Sassou-Nguesso camps mounted. When President Lissouba's government forces surrounded Sassou-Nguesso's compound in Brazzaville with armored vehicles on June 5, Sassou-Nguesso ordered his militia to resist. Thus began a 4-month conflict that destroyed or damaged much of Brazzaville. In early October, Angolan troops invaded Congo on the side of Sassou-Nguesso and, in mid-October, the Lissouba government fell. Soon thereafter, Sassou-Nguesso declared himself President and named a 33-member government.

In January 1998, the Sassou-Nguesso regime held a National Forum for Reconciliation to determine the nature and duration of the transition period. The forum, tightly controlled by the government, decided elections should be held in about 3 years, elected a transition advisory legislature, and announced that a constitutional convention would finalize a draft constitution. However, the eruption in late 1998 of fighting between Sassou-Nguesso's government forces and a pro-Lissouba and pro-Kolelas armed opposition disrupted the transition to democracy. This new violence also closed the economically vital Brazzaville-Pointe Noire railroad, caused great destruction and loss of life in southern Brazzaville and in the Pool, Bouenza, and Niari regions, and displaced hundreds of thousands of persons. In November and December 1999, the government signed agreements with representatives of many, though not all, of the rebel groups.

The December accord, mediated by President Omar Bongo of Gabon, called for follow-on, inclusive political negotiations between the government and the opposition. During the years 2000-01, Sassou-Nguesso's government conducted a national dialogue (Dialogue Sans Exclusif), in which the opposition parties and the government agreed to continue on the path to peace. Ex-President Lissouba and ex-Prime Minister Kolelas refused to agree and were exiled. They were tried in absentia and convicted in Brazzaville of charges ranging from treason to misappropriation of government funds. Ex-militiamen were granted amnesty, and many were provided micro-loans to aid their reintegration into civil society. Not all opposition members participated. One group, referred to as "Ninjas," actively opposed the government in a low-level guerrilla war in the Pool region of the country. Other members of opposition parties have returned and have opted to participate to some degree in political life.

A new constitution was drafted in 2001, approved by the provisional legislature (National Transition Council), and approved by the people of Congo in a national referendum in January 2002. Presidential elections were held in March 2002, and Sassou-Nguesso was declared the winner. Legislative elections were held in May and June 2002. In March 2003 the government signed a peace accord with the Ninjas, and the country has remained stable and calm since the signing. Internally displaced persons are returning to the Pool region. President Sassou-Nguesso allowed Kolelas to return to Congo for his wife's funeral in October 2005 and subsequently asked that Parliament grant Kolelas amnesty. Parliament complied with Sassou-Nguesso's request in December 2005.

In 2007, Sassou-Nguesso announced he would allow the return of former president Pascal Lissouba, along with a pardon for the 2001 in absentia conviction for “economic crimes” for which Lissouba had been sentenced to 30 years. By early 2008, however, Lissouba had not returned to the country. Former prime minister Joachim Yhombi-Opango, returned to the country in August 2007 after the Council of Ministers granted him amnesty in May for a 2001 conviction in absentia for allegedly improperly selling the country’s oil while in office. Legislative elections were held in June and August 2007 and were widely viewed as disorganized and marred by irregularities, with low voter turnout. Presidential elections are scheduled for 2009.

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICAL CONDITIONS 
Before the 1997 war, the Congolese system of government was similar to that of the French. However, after taking power, Sassou-Nguesso suspended the constitution approved in 1992 upon which this system was based. The 2002 constitution provides for a 7-year presidential term. There is a parliament of two houses, whose members serve for 5 years.

Principal Government Officials 
President--Denis Sassou-Nguesso
Prime Minister, Coordinator of the Action of the Cabinet and of Privatizations--Isidore Mvoumba
State Minister, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Relations with Francophone Countries--Basile Ikouebe
Minister of Economy, Finance and Budget--Pacifique Issoibeka
Ambassador to the United States--Serge Mombouli
Ambassador to the United Nations--Pascal Gayama

The Congo maintains an embassy in the United States at 4891 Colorado Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20011 (tel: 202-726-5500). The Congolese Mission to the United Nations is at 14 East 65th Street, New York, NY 10021 (tel: 212-744-7840).

ECONOMY
The Congo's economy is based primarily on its petroleum sector, which is by far the country's major revenue earner. The Congolese oil sector is dominated by the French oil company TotalFinaElf. In second position is the Italian oil firm Agip. Chevron Overseas Limited (in partnership with TotalFinaElf) is the primary American oil company active in petroleum exploration or production. Murphy Oil has signed a contract but has not begun exploration or production; that project should begin in 2008. Congo's oil production is expected to decline over the next 15 years with fields yielding less. However, based on an agreement with Angola signed in 2002 to jointly administer certain Congo-Cabinda border areas, Congo's production could rise if exploration is successful. Murphy Oil signed a Production Sharing Agreement (PSA) with Congo in 2003 for two deepwater off-shore permits and expects to begin work in 2008. Congo hopes to offset declining production in other fields with these new PSAs.

The country's abundant northern rain forests are the source of timber. Forestry, which led Congolese exports before the discovery of oil, now generates less than 7% of export earnings. Wood production came to a standstill during the war years but has recommenced, and new concessions were leased in 2001.

Earlier in the decade, Congo's major employer was the state bureaucracy, which had 80,000 employees on its payroll--enormous for a country of Congo's size. The World Bank and other international financial institutions pressured Congo to institute sweeping civil service reforms in order to reduce the size of the state bureaucracy and pare back a civil service payroll that amounted to more than 20% of GDP in 1993. The effort to cut back began in 1994 with a 50% devaluation that cut the payroll in half in dollar terms. By the middle of 1994, there was a reduction of nearly 8,000 in civil service employees.

Between 1994-1996, the Congolese economy underwent a difficult transition. The prospects for building the foundation of a healthy economy, however, were better than at any time in the previous 15 years. Congo took a number of measures to liberalize its economy, including reforming the tax, investment, labor, timber, and hydrocarbon codes. In 2002-03 Congo privatized key parastatals, primarily banks, telecommunications, and transportation monopolies, to help improve a dilapidated and unreliable infrastructure.

By the end of 1996, Congo had made substantial progress in various areas targeted for reform. It made significant strides toward macroeconomic stabilization through improving public finances and restructuring external debt. This change was accompanied by improvements in the structure of expenditures, with a reduction in personnel expenditures. Further, Congo benefited from debt restructuring from a Paris Club agreement in July 1996.

This reform program came to a halt, however, in early June 1997 when war broke out, and the return of armed conflict in 1998-99 hindered economic reform and recovery. President Sassou-Nguesso has moved forward on improved governance, economic reforms, and privatization, as well as on cooperation with international financial institutions. President Sassou-Nguesso also has made speeches outlining the need for good governance and transparency in the Congo, particularly during his 2003 and 2004 National Day Addresses.

Before June 1997, Congo and the United States ratified a bilateral investment treaty designed to facilitate and protect foreign investment. The country also adopted a new investment code intended to attract foreign capital. The country has made some commendable efforts at political and economic reform, but despite these successes, Congo's investment climate has challenges, offering few meaningful incentives for new investors. High costs for labor, energy, raw materials, and transportation; a restrictive labor code; low productivity and high production costs; and a deteriorating transportation infrastructure have been among the factors discouraging investment. Five years of civil conflict (1997-2003) further damaged infrastructure, though the privatization of some statal and parastatal enterprises has generated some interest from U.S. companies.

In March 2006, the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) approved Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) decision point treatment for Congo, noting that Congo has performed satisfactorily on an IMF-supported program and developed an interim Poverty Reduction Strategy. The IMF and World Bank also noted, however, that Congo needed to address serious concerns about governance and financial transparency in order to qualify for completion point and irrevocable debt relief. Specifically, Congo needs to bring the internal controls and accounting system of the state-owned oil company (SNPC) up to internationally recognized standards; prevent conflicts of interests in the marketing of oil; require SNPC officials to publicly declare and divest any interests in companies having a business relationship with SNPC; and implement an anti-corruption action plan with international support. Any resources that are freed by interim debt relief granted to Congo must be used for poverty reduction under a reform program closely monitored by the international financial institutions. The poverty reduction program has been marked by continued delays, and progress in 2007 was incremental at best.

In November 2007, Congo was readmitted to the Kimberley Process, an international multi-stakeholder initiative designed to stem the trade of conflict diamonds. Congo had been suspended from the Kimberley Process in 2004 after reviews showed its diamond exports vastly outnumbered its production capacity. Congo’s government estimates current diamond capacity to be 5,000 carats, with a potential for 50,000 to 70,000 carats.

The London Club and Congolese Government also signed an agreement in November 2007 forgiving 77% of the country’s London Club debt. The agreement followed similar measures with the Paris Club, which has now forgiven up to 90% to 100% of the country’s debt. The Congo Government continues to face lawsuits from companies who purchase the country’s debt on the secondary markets and attempt to reclaim the debt through Western legal systems.

FOREIGN RELATIONS 
For the two decades preceding Congo's 1991 national conference, the country was firmly in the socialist camp, allied principally with the Soviet Union and other Eastern bloc nations. Educational, economic, and foreign aid links between Congo and its Eastern bloc allies were extensive, with the Congolese military and security forces receiving significant Soviet, East German, and Cuban assistance.

France, the former colonial power, maintained a continuing but somewhat subdued relationship with Congo, offering a variety of cultural, educational, and economic assistance. The principal element in the French-Congolese relationship was the highly successful oil sector investment of the French petroleum parastatal Elf-Aquitaine (now called TotalFinaElf), which entered the Congo in 1968 and has continued to grow.

After the worldwide collapse of communism and Congo's adoption of multi-party democracy in 1991, Congo's bilateral relations with its former socialist allies became relatively less important. France is now by far Congo's principal external partner, contributing significant amounts of economic assistance, while playing a highly influential role. However, there is a growing interest in attracting American investors.

Congo is a member of the United Nations, African Union, African Development Bank, World Trade Organization (WTO), Central African Economic and Monetary Community (CEMAC), Central African Customs and Economic Union (UDEAC), International Coffee Organization, Economic Community of Central African States ECCAS/CEEAC), INTERPOL, the Nonaligned Movement, and the Group of 77. Congo held a seat on the United Nations Security Council during 2006-2007. In January 2006, President Sassou-Nguesso was elected for a one-year term as Chairman of the African Union.

U.S.-CONGOLESE RELATIONS 
Diplomatic relations between the United States and Congo were broken during the most radical Congolese-Marxist period, 1965-77. The U.S. Embassy reopened in 1977 with the restoration of relations, which remained distant until the end of the socialist era. The late 1980s were marked by a progressive warming of Congolese relations with Western countries, including the United States. Congolese President Denis Sassou-Nguesso made a state visit to Washington in 1990, where he was received by President George H.W. Bush.

With the advent of democracy in 1991, Congo's relations with the United States improved and were cooperative. The United States has enthusiastically supported Congolese democratization efforts, contributing aid to the country's electoral process. The Congolese Government demonstrated an active interest in deepening and broadening its relations with the United States. Transition Prime Minister Andre Milongo made an official visit to Washington in 1992, where President Bush received him at the White House.

Then-presidential candidate Pascal Lissouba traveled to Washington in 1992, meeting with a variety of officials, including Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Herman J. Cohen. After his election in August 1992, President Lissouba expressed interest in expanding U.S.-Congo links, seeking increased U.S. development aid, university exchanges, and greater U.S. investment in Congo. With the outbreak of the 1997 war, the U.S. Embassy was evacuated. The Embassy was closed, and its personnel became resident in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

In 2001 Embassy-suspended operations were lifted, and Embassy personnel were allowed to travel to Brazzaville for periods of extended temporary duty from the U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa. As a result, U.S.-Congo bilateral relations were reinvigorated. In 2003 and 2004 this practice continued, and a site for construction of a new Embassy was acquired in July 2004. Construction is well underway on the new Embassy compound, with a scheduled completion in February 2009. Embassy Brazzaville now operates from temporary offices in a commercial bank building in downtown Brazzaville. Relations between the United States and the government of President Denis Sassou-Nguesso are strong, positive, and cooperative.

Principal U.S. Officials 
Ambassador--Alan W. Eastham
Deputy Chief of Mission--Cynthia Gregg
Management Officer--Vanessa Brooks
Consular/Economic Officer--VACANT
Office Manager--Ina Erickson

The U.S. Embassy accredited to Congo is located at BDEAC Building, 4th Floor, Brazzaville, Republic of the Congo (tel: 242-81-14-80; fax: 243-81-5324).

 
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Household Appliances Market in Germany - October 2008
Dental Industry in Taiwan - October 2008
Mining Industry in the Philippines - October 2008
Pharmaceutical Industry in the Philippines - October 2008
Automobiles Auto Parts and Accessories Industry in Slovakia - October 2008
Clinical Laboratory Equipment Market in Norway - October 2008
Book Publishing Market in China - October 2008
Wind Energy Market in China - October 2008
Internet Security Market in Switzerland - October 2008
Ski Market to the United States from Australia - October 2008
Motorcycles Market in Italy - October 2008
Automotive Tuning Market in Italy - October 2008
Geothermal Energy Market in Indonesia - October 2008
Generic Drugs Market in Japan - October 2008
Tancredo Neves International Airport - Industrial Airport Project in Brazil - November 2008
Floor Covering Industry in Germany - November 2008
Pleasure Boats Market in Germany - November 2008
Medical Equipment and Devices Market in Switzerland - November 2008
Energy Market in Greece - November 2008
Economic Overview of Minas Gerais in Brazil - November 2008
Agricultural Machinery and Equipment in Uruguay - November 2008
Franchising in Singapore - November 2008
Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Market in Argentina - November 2008
Green Building and Green Building Material Market in Taiwan - November 2008
Defense Procurement Market in Greece - November 2008
Medical Equipment Market in Italy - November 2008
Laboratory Analytical Instruments Market in Taiwan - November 2008
DIY (Do-It-Yourself) Hardware Products Market in Australia - November 2008
Cardio Equipment Market in Kazakhstan - November 2008
Airport Expansion Projects in the UK - November 2008
Medical Industry Market in Austria - November 2008
Green Building Technology in Japan - August 2008
Mining Equipment in Kazakhstan - August 2008
Biofuels in Indonesia - August 2008
Heavy Equipment Market in Indonesia - August 2008
Business Continuity Planning Industry in Japan - August 2008
Machine Tools in Japan - August 2008
Aquaculture Equipment Industry in Canada - August 2008
Cosmetics Market in the Philippines - August 2008
Agricultural Chemicals in Kazakhstan - August 2008
Overseas Study Market in Chongqing in China - August 2008
Water Supply And Wastewater Disposal in Germany - August 2008
Sending Samples from the US to Mexico - August 2008
Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Market in Japan - August 2008
Education Market in the Czech Republic - August 2008
Healthcare Industry in Japan - August 2008
Internet and Online Services in China - August 2008
IT Security Products in Australia - August 2008
Clinical Laboratory Market in China - August 2008
Printing and Graphic Arts Industry in Mexico - August 2008
Book Publishing Market in Belgium - August 2008
Electronics Industry in the Czech Republic - August 2008
Automotive Industry in the Czech Republic - August 2008
Cosmetics and Toiletries in New Zealand - August 2008
Franchising in India - August 2008
Diagnostic Laboratory Test Products in Hong Kong - August 2008
Packaging Equipment, Materials and Containers in Argentina - August 2008
Franchising in Denmark - August 2008
Graduate Student Market in Canada - August 2008
Defense Market in the UK - August 2008
UAVs in the Defence Industry in Canada - August 2008
Business Aviation Industry in Japan - August 2008
Retail Loss Prevention Systems in Canada - August 2008
Regulatory Environment for Medical Devices in Taiwan - August 2008
Bookselling Industry in the UK - August 2008
Micro- and Nanomanufacturing Market in Germany - August 2008
Tourism Infrastructure Investment in Thailand - August 2008
Cosmetics and Toiletries Market in Singapore - August 2008
Furniture Industry in Brazil - August 2008
Automotive Framework Legislation in the EU - August 2008
Insurance Services in India - August 2008
Wind Energy in Germany - August 2008
Digital Broadcast Market In Turkey - August 2008
Electronics Industry in Thailand - August 2008
Conformity Assessments in Panama - August 2008
Toys and Games Industry in Canada - August 2008
Water Filtration Equipment Industry in Canada - August 2008
Caravans and Trailers in Australia - July 2008
Mine Safety Equipment in India - July 2008
Dental Industry in Germany - July 2008
E-Health Market in Germany - July 2008
Publishing Industry in Mexico - July 2008
Automotive Aftermarket Parts and Accessories and Service Equipment in Canada - July 2008
Oil and Gas Projects in Malaysia - July 2008
Transport Sector Public Private Partnerships General Legal Framework in Egypt - July 2008
Dental Industry in Korea - July 2008
Cosmetics Market in Indonesia - July 2008
Personal Care in China - July 2008
Broadband Market in Singapore - September 2008
Soil Remediation in Japan - September 2008
Business Aviation Industry in Mexico - September 2008
Education Services in Taiwan - September 2008
Specialty Food in Italy - September 2008
Pumps for Water and Wastewater Industry in Poland - September 2008
WiMAX in Taiwan - September 2008
Dental Supplies and Equipment in Mexico - September 2008
Water Supply and Treatment in Ukraine - September 2008
Commercial and Heavy-Duty Vehicles in Austria - September 2008
Renewable Energy and Microgeneration in Portugal - September 2008
Alternative Drives for Electric and Hybrid Technology Vehicles in Germany - September 2008
Water and Wastewater Industry in Hungary - September 2008
Energy Market in Italy - September 2008
Construction Market in Bulgaria - September 2008
Power Generation Equipment in India - September 2008
Construction Equipment in Panama - September 2008
Video Games Market in Hong Kong - September 2008
Packaging Machinery Market in Mexico - September 2008
Cosmetics Market in Kenya - September 2008
Aircraft and Parts in Austria - September 2008
Wireless Communications in Thailand - September 2008
Water and Wastewater in Malaysia - September 2008
Fast Moving Consumer Goods in Australia - September 2008
Poultry Farming in Australia - September 2008
Energy Efficiency and Green Buildings Market in Hong Kong - September 2008
Printing Machinery and Equipment in Poland - September 2008
Specialty Software Market in China - September 2008
Airport Surveillance And Security Equipment in India - September 2008
Plastics Industry in Morocco - September 2008
Healthcare Information Technology in Malaysia - September 2008
Automotive Aftermarket in Korea - September 2008
Water Supply and Distribution in Indonesia - September 2008
Men’s Wear Apparel in Japan - September 2008
Security Equipment and Services in Slovakia - September 2008
PDVSA’s Oil and Gas Projects in Venezuela - September 2008
Environmental Services Market in Mexico - September 2008
Food Processing and Packaging Equipment in Uruguay - September 2008
Outbound Tourism to the US from Taiwan - September 2008
Medical Equipment Market in Greece - September 2008
Broadband Market in Sweden - September 2008
Outbound Tourism to the US from Italy - September 2008
Veterinary Equipment Market in Uruguay - September 2008
Capital Markets in Uruguay - September 2008
Financial Services in Panama - September 2008
Pan-European Oil Pipeline Project Romania to Italy - October 2008
ICT Market in Italy - October 2008
IT Security Software in Germany - October 2008
Medical Devices in Germany - October 2008
Book Market in Taiwan - October 2008
Natural Health Products in Canada - October 2008
Building Insulation Products in Italy - October 2008
Industrial Chemical Industry in Monterrey in Mexico - October 2008
Medical Equipment Market in Hungary - October 2008
Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) in Argentina - October 2008
Safety and Security Industry in Colombia - October 2008
Outbound Travel to the US from Mexico - October 2008
E-Government in Poland - October 2008
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Industry in Germany - October 2008
Material Handling Machinery in Canada - October 2008
Agricultural Chemical Market in Chihuahua in Mexico - October 2008
Medical Biotechnology in Japan - October 2008
Nuclear Power Generation in South Africa - October 2008
Mining Equipment in Australia - October 2008
Dental Equipment in Jordan - October 2008
Manufacturing Software – CAD/CAM in India - October 2008
Agriculture, Fertilizer, Food and Grocery Retail in Egypt - October 2008
Aircraft and Parts in Australia - October 2008
 

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