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 Guinea-Bissau
 
Flag of Guinea-Bissau is two equal horizontal bands of yellow (top) and green with a vertical red band on the hoist side; there is a black five-pointed star centered in the red band.

PROFILE

OFFICIAL NAME:
Republic of Guinea-Bissau

GeographyMap of Guinea-Bissau
Area (including Bijagos Archipelago): 36,125 sq. km., about the size of Maryland.
Cities: Capital--Bissau. Other cities--Bafata, Gabu, Canchungo, Farim, Cacheu. 
Regions: Oio, Tombali, Cacheu, Bolama, Quinara, Biombo, Bafata, Gabu.
Terrain: Coastal plain; savanna in the east. 
Climate: Tropical.

People 
Nationality: Noun and adjective--Bissau-Guinean(s). 
Population (2006): 1,700,000.
Population growth rate (2005): 3%.
Ethnic groups: Balanta 30%, Fula 20%, Manjaca 14%, Mandinga 13%, Papel 7%, others 16%. 
Religions: Indigenous beliefs 50%, Muslim 45%, Christian 5%. 
Languages: Portuguese (official), Creole, French; many indigenous languages--Balanta-Kentohe 26%, Pulaar 18%, Mandjak 12%, Mandinka 11%, Pepel 9%, Biafada 3%, Mancanha 3%, Bidyogo 2%, Ejamat 2%, Mansoanka 1%, Bainoukgunyuno 1%, Nalu 1%, Soninke 1%, Badjara 1%, Bayote 0.5%, Kobiana 0.04%, Cassanga 0.04%, Basary 0.03%. 
Education: Years compulsory--4. Literacy (2005)--39.6% of adults. 
Health: Infant mortality rate (2005)--200 deaths/1,000 live births. Life expectancy (2005)--45.8 years.
Work force (480,000): Agriculture--85%; industry, services, and commerce--13%; government--2%.

Government 
Type: Republic, multi-party since 1991. 
Independence: September 24, 1973 (proclaimed unilaterally); September 10, 1974 (de jure from Portugal). 
Constitution: Adopted 1984. The National Assembly adopted a new constitution in 2001, but it was neither promulgated nor vetoed by the President. 
Branches: Executive--president (chief of state), prime minister (head of government) and Council of State, ministers and secretaries of state. Legislature--National Popular Assembly (ANP), 100 members directly elected in 2004. Judicial--Supreme Court and lower courts. 
Administrative subdivisions: Autonomous sector of Bissau and eight regions. 
Political parties: In the March 2004 parliamentary elections, the African Party for the Independence of Guinea-Bissau and Cape Verde (PAIGC) won 45 seats; the Social Renovation Party (PRS) won 35 seats; and the United Social Democratic Party (PUSD) won 17 seats. In addition to these three major parties, there are numerous other political parties. 
Suffrage: Universal at 18.

Economy
GDP (2007): $386.8 million (est.). 
Annual growth rate (2007): 3.7% (est.).
GDP per capita, purchasing power parity (2005): $600 (est.). 
Natural resources: Fish and timber. Bauxite and phosphate deposits are not exploited; offshore petroleum. 
Agriculture: Products--cashews, tropical fruits, rice, peanuts, cotton, palm oil. Arable land--11%. Forested--38%. 
Industry: Very little industrial capacity remains following the 1998 internal conflict. The cashew processing industry is nascent.
Trade: Exports--$110 million (f.o.b., 2006): cashews ($66 million, 2006), fish and shrimp ($1 million, 2006). Major markets (2006)--India 72.4%, Nigeria 17.2%, Ecuador 4.1%, Italy 1.4%, and South Korea 1.3%. Imports--$28 million (f.o.b., 2006): food ($49 million, 2005), fuel and energy ($20 million, 2006), capital goods ($8 million, 2006). Major suppliers (2006)--Senegal 22.6%, Portugal 17.7%, Italy 12.2%, Pakistan 4.3%, and Cote d'Ivoire 3.2%.

PEOPLE
The population of Guinea-Bissau is ethnically diverse with distinct languages, customs, and social structures. Most people are farmers, with traditional religious beliefs (animism); 45% are Muslim, principally Fula and Mandinka speakers concentrated in the north and northeast. Other important groups are the Balanta and Papel, living in the southern coastal regions, and the Manjaco and Mancanha, occupying the central and northern coastal areas.

HISTORY
The rivers of Guinea and the islands of Cape Verde were among the first areas in Africa explored by the Portuguese in the 15th century. Portugal claimed Portuguese Guinea in 1446, but few trading posts were established before 1600. In 1630, a "captaincy-general" of Portuguese Guinea was established to administer the territory. With the cooperation of some local tribes, the Portuguese entered the slave trade and exported large numbers of Africans to the Western Hemisphere via the Cape Verde Islands. Cacheu became one of the major slave centers, and a small fort still stands in the town. The slave trade declined in the 19th century, and Bissau, originally founded as a military and slave-trading center in 1765, grew to become the major commercial center.

Portuguese conquest and consolidation of the interior did not begin until the latter half of the 19th century. Portugal lost part of Guinea to French West Africa, including the center of earlier Portuguese commercial interest, the Casamance River region. A dispute with Great Britain over the island of Bolama was settled in Portugal's favor with the involvement of U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant.

Before World War I, Portuguese forces, with some assistance from the Muslim population, subdued animist tribes and eventually established the territory's borders. The interior of Portuguese Guinea was brought under control after more than 30 years of fighting; final subjugation of the Bijagos Islands did not occur until 1936. The administrative capital was moved from Bolama to Bissau in 1941, and in 1952, by constitutional amendment, the colony of Portuguese Guinea became an overseas province of Portugal.

In 1956, Amilcar Cabral and Raphael Barbosa organized the African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC) clandestinely. The PAIGC moved its headquarters to Conakry, Guinea, in 1960 and started an armed rebellion against the Portuguese in 1961. Despite the presence of Portuguese troops, which grew to more than 35,000, the PAIGC steadily expanded its influence until, by 1968, it controlled most of the country.

It established civilian rule in the territory under its control and held elections for a National Assembly. Portuguese forces and civilians increasingly were confined to their garrisons and larger towns. The Portuguese Governor and Commander in Chief from 1968 to 1973, Gen. Antonio de Spinola, returned to Portugal and led the movement that brought democracy to Portugal and independence for its colonies.

Amilcar Cabral was assassinated in Conakry in 1973, and party leadership fell to Aristides Pereira, who later became the first President of the Republic of Cape Verde. The PAIGC National Assembly met at Boe in the southeastern region and declared the independence of Guinea-Bissau on September 24, 1973. Following Portugal's April 1974 revolution, it granted independence to Guinea-Bissau on September 10, 1974. The United States recognized the new nation that day. Luis Cabral, Amilcar Cabral's half-brother, became President of Guinea-Bissau. In late 1980, the government was overthrown in a relatively bloodless coup led by Prime Minister and former armed forces commander Joao Bernardo "Nino" Vieira.

From November 1980 to May 1984, power was held by a provisional government responsible to a Revolutionary Council headed by President Joao Bernardo Vieira. In 1984, the council was dissolved, and the National Popular Assembly (ANP) was reconstituted. The single-party assembly approved a new constitution, elected President Vieira to a new 5-year term, and elected a Council of State, which was the executive agent of the ANP. Under this system, the president presided over the Council of State and served as head of state and government. The president also was head of the PAIGC and commander in chief of the armed forces.

There were alleged coup plots against the Vieira government in 1983, 1985, and 1993. In 1986, first Vice President Paulo Correia and five others were executed for treason following a lengthy trial. In 1994, the country's first multi-party legislative and presidential elections were held. An army uprising against the Vieira government in June 1998 triggered a bloody civil war that created hundreds of thousands of displaced persons and resulted in President Vieria having to request assistance from the governments of Senegal and Guinea, who provided troops to quell the uprising. The President was ousted by a military junta in May 1999. An interim government turned over power in February 2000 when opposition leader Kumba Yala, founder of the Social Renovation Party (PRS), took office following two rounds of transparent presidential elections.

Despite the elections, democracy did not take root in the succeeding 3 years. President Yala neither vetoed nor promulgated the new constitution that was approved by the National Assembly in April 2001. The resulting ambiguity undermined the rule of law. Impulsive presidential interventions in ministerial operations hampered effective governance. On November 14, 2002, the President dismissed the government of Prime Minister Alamara Nhasse, dissolved the National Assembly, and called for legislative elections. Two days later, he appointed Prime Minister Mario Pires to lead a caretaker government controlled by presidential decree. Elections for the National Assembly were scheduled for April 2003, but later postponed until June and then October. On September 12, 2003, the President of the National Elections Commission announced that it would be impossible to hold the elections on October 12, 2003, as scheduled. The army, led by Chief of Defense General Verrisimo Correia Seabra, intervened on September 14, 2003. President Yala announced his "voluntary" resignation and was placed under house arrest. The government was dissolved and a 25-member Committee for Restoration of Democracy and Constitutional Order was established. On September 28, 2003, businessman Henrique Rosa was sworn in as President. He had the support of most political parties and of civil society. Artur Sanha, PRS President, was sworn in as Prime Minister. On March 28 and 30, 2004, Guinea-Bissau held legislative elections which international observers deemed acceptably free and fair. On May 9, 2004, Carlos Gomes Junior became Prime Minister.

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICAL CONDITIONS 
On August 10, 2005 Joao Bernardo Vieria was declared the winner of a July 24 presidential runoff election over Malam Bacai Sanha in an election judged by international observers to be free and fair. President Vieria was inaugurated on October 1, 2005. Prime Minister Carlos Gomes Junior refused to accept Vieira's victory, and on October 28, Vieira dismissed Gomes and his government. Five days later, he installed former PAIGC official Aristide Gomes as Prime Minister.

Throughout 2006, President Vieira struggled to maintain control over the National Assembly and the general operations of the government. In early March 2007, the three main political parties--the PAIGC, the PRS, and the PUSD--agreed to push for a "government of consensus" in the interests of parliamentary stability. President Vieira refused to accept the decision, and on March 19 the National Popular Assembly passed a vote of no confidence against Prime Minister Aristide Gomes. President Vieira was then faced with the decision of dissolving the government and calling for new elections or appointing a new prime minister. Prime Minister Gomes resigned on March 29. In early April 2007, after much resistance, President Vieira accepted the appointment of Martinho N'Dafa Cabi as the new Prime Minister.

Prime Minister Cabi has called for a "relentless" fight against drug trafficking and vowed to instill fiscal discipline in the Government of Guinea-Bissau. This is especially important given the recent increase in news media reports examining Guinea-Bissau's role in the West African regional drug trade. The government has implemented a number of policies to this end, and has succeeded in gaining the support of many in the donor community. Guinea-Bissau is perceived to be gaining political stability under this government, while still fragile. Parliamentary elections are scheduled for November 16, 2008. This election will be crucial to the ongoing efforts for growth and stability in the country.

Principal Government Officials 
President--Joao Bernardo Vieria
Prime Minister--Martinho N'Dafa Cabi

Ministers
Minister of Economy--Abudacar Demba Dahaba
Minister of Finance--Issufo Sanha
Minister of Defense--Marciano Silva Barbeiro
Minister of Justice--Carmelita Barbosa Rodrigues Pires
Minister of Foreign Affairs--Maria de Conceicao Nobre Cabral
Minister of Interior--Certorio Biote

Ambassador to the UN--Alfredo Cabral
Ambassador to the U.S.--vacant

Guinea-Bissau does not have official representation in Washington, DC.

ECONOMY
Guinea-Bissau is among the world's least developed nations and depends mainly on agriculture and fishing. Guinea-Bissau exports some fish and seafood, although most fishing in Guinea-Bissau's waters is presently not done by Bissau-Guineans and no fish or seafood is processed in Guinea-Bissau for export. The country's other important product is cashews. License fees for fishing provide the government with some revenue. Rice is a major crop and staple food and, if developed, Guinea-Bissau could potentially be self-sufficient in rice. Tropical fruits such as mangos could also provide more income to the country if the sector were developed. Because of high costs, the development of petroleum, phosphate, and other mineral resources is not a near-term prospect. However, unexploited offshore oil reserves may possibly provide much-needed revenue in the long run.

The military conflict that took place in Guinea-Bissau from June 1998 to early 1999 caused severe damage to the country's infrastructure and widely disrupted economic activity. Agricultural production is estimated to have fallen by 17% during the conflict, and the civil war led to a 28% overall drop in gross domestic product (GDP) in 1998. Cashew nut output, the main export crop, declined in 1998 by an estimated 30%. World cashew prices dropped by more than 50% in 2000, compounding the economic devastation caused by the conflict. Before the war, trade reform and price liberalization were the most successful part of the country's structural adjustment program under International Monetary Fund (IMF) sponsorship. Under the government's post-conflict economic and financial program, implemented with IMF and World Bank input, real GDP recovered in 1999 by almost 8%. In December 2000 Guinea-Bissau qualified for almost $800 million in debt-service relief under the first phase of the enhanced Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative. However, Guinea-Bissau's Poverty Reduction and Growth Fund program with the IMF was suspended that same month--following disbursement of the first tranche--due to off-program expenditures by the Yala regime. Thus, IMF and Paris Club internal debt relief for Guinea-Bissau was also suspended in 2001.

After a disastrous 2006, Guinea-Bissau's economy bounced back in 2007. Cashews, the country's principal cash crop, rebounded strongly in 2007 after the government's 2006 attempt to artificially set the price of cashews at 70 U.S. cents/kg--more than twice what traders were willing to pay. The economy also benefited from robust growth in the country's tourism industry. Guinea-Bissau appears ready to continue its economic growth in 2008 with new support from international donors and a recovery in cashew exports. Guinea Bissau has announced that Angola will be investing U.S. $500 million in a project to mine 3 million tons of bauxite per year. The IMF and World Bank resumed development support, and in January 2008 the IMF announced its approval for $2.8 million in emergency post-conflict assistance. Oil prospecting continues; however, this has yet to provide results that would encourage significant investment. GDP is projected to increase in 2008, with the deficit projected to decrease.

FOREIGN RELATIONS
Guinea-Bissau follows a nonaligned foreign policy and seeks friendly and cooperative relations with a wide variety of states and organizations. Angola, Cuba, the European Union, France, Gambia, Portugal, Brazil, Nigeria, People's Republic of China, Libya, Senegal, Spain, Guinea, and Russia have embassies in Bissau. Belgium, Canada, Germany, Mauritania, the Netherlands, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the U.S. conduct diplomatic relations with Guinea-Bissau through their embassies in neighboring Dakar, Senegal.

Guinea-Bissau is a member of the UN and many of its specialized and related agencies. It is a member of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF); African Development Bank (AFDB), Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU), Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), African Union, and permanent Interstate Committee for drought control in the Sahel (CILSS). Guinea-Bissau also is a member of the Group of 77 (G-77), International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), and World Health Organization (WHO).

U.S.-GUINEA-BISSAU RELATIONS
The U.S. Embassy suspended operations in Bissau on June 14, 1998, in the midst of violent conflict between forces loyal to then-President Vieira and the military-led junta. Prior to and following the Embassy closure, the United States and Guinea-Bissau have enjoyed excellent bilateral relations.

The U.S. recognized the independence of Guinea-Bissau on September 10, 1974. Guinea-Bissau's Ambassador to the United States and the United Nations was one of the first the new nation sent abroad. The U.S. opened an Embassy in Bissau in 1976, and the first U.S. Ambassador presented credentials later that year.

U.S. assistance began in 1975 with a $1 million grant to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees for resettlement of refugees returning to Guinea-Bissau and for 25 training grants at African technical schools for Guinean students. Emergency food was a major element in U.S. assistance to Guinea-Bissau in the first years after independence. Since 1975, the U.S. has provided more than $65 million in grant aid and other assistance.

Since the 1998 war the U.S. has provided over $800,000 for humanitarian demining to a non-governmental organization (NGO) which has removed over 2,500 mines and 11,000 unexploded ordnance from the city of Bissau; $1.6 million in food aid; and nearly $3 million for assistance for refugees, improving the cashew industry, and promoting democracy.

The United States and Guinea-Bissau signed an international military education and training (IMET) agreement in 1986, and prior to 1998, the U.S. provided English-language teaching facilities as well as communications and navigational equipment to support the navy's coastal surveillance program. The U.S. European Command's Humanitarian Assistance Program has assisted with $390,000 for constructing or repairing schools, health centers, and bridges.

The Peace Corps withdrew from Guinea-Bissau in 1998 at the start of the civil war.

In August 2004, sanctions under Section 508 of the Foreign Operations Appropriations Act--which were imposed as a result of the September 2003 military coup--were lifted and Bissau once again became eligible for IMET and other direct aid.

In March 2007, the U.S. and Brazil signed a Tripartite Memorandum of Understanding with Guinea-Bissau highlighting a parliamentary strengthening project first implemented in 2005.

Principal U.S. Officials (resident in Dakar, Senegal) 
Ambassador--vacant 
Deputy Chief of Mission--Jay T. Smith

There is no U.S. Embassy in Bissau. The U.S. Ambassador to Senegal, who resides in Dakar, is accredited as the U.S. Ambassador to Guinea-Bissau. All official U.S. contact with Guinea-Bissau is handled by the U.S. Embassy in Dakar, Senegal. Local employees staff the U.S. Office in Bissau, and American diplomats from the Embassy in Dakar travel frequently to Bissau to conduct normal diplomatic relations.

 
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Construction Market in Bulgaria - September 2008
Power Generation Equipment in India - September 2008
Construction Equipment in Panama - September 2008
Video Games Market in Hong Kong - September 2008
Packaging Machinery Market in Mexico - September 2008
Cosmetics Market in Kenya - September 2008
Aircraft and Parts in Austria - September 2008
Wireless Communications in Thailand - September 2008
Water and Wastewater in Malaysia - September 2008
Fast Moving Consumer Goods in Australia - September 2008
Poultry Farming in Australia - September 2008
Energy Efficiency and Green Buildings Market in Hong Kong - September 2008
Printing Machinery and Equipment in Poland - September 2008
Specialty Software Market in China - September 2008
Airport Surveillance And Security Equipment in India - September 2008
Plastics Industry in Morocco - September 2008
Healthcare Information Technology in Malaysia - September 2008
Automotive Aftermarket in Korea - September 2008
Water Supply and Distribution in Indonesia - September 2008
Men’s Wear Apparel in Japan - September 2008
Security Equipment and Services in Slovakia - September 2008
PDVSA’s Oil and Gas Projects in Venezuela - September 2008
Environmental Services Market in Mexico - September 2008
Food Processing and Packaging Equipment in Uruguay - September 2008
Outbound Tourism to the US from Taiwan - September 2008
Medical Equipment Market in Greece - September 2008
Broadband Market in Sweden - September 2008
Outbound Tourism to the US from Italy - September 2008
Veterinary Equipment Market in Uruguay - September 2008
Capital Markets in Uruguay - September 2008
Financial Services in Panama - September 2008
Pan-European Oil Pipeline Project Romania to Italy - October 2008
ICT Market in Italy - October 2008
IT Security Software in Germany - October 2008
Medical Devices in Germany - October 2008
Book Market in Taiwan - October 2008
Natural Health Products in Canada - October 2008
Building Insulation Products in Italy - October 2008
Industrial Chemical Industry in Monterrey in Mexico - October 2008
Medical Equipment Market in Hungary - October 2008
Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) in Argentina - October 2008
Safety and Security Industry in Colombia - October 2008
Outbound Travel to the US from Mexico - October 2008
E-Government in Poland - October 2008
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Industry in Germany - October 2008
Material Handling Machinery in Canada - October 2008
Agricultural Chemical Market in Chihuahua in Mexico - October 2008
Medical Biotechnology in Japan - October 2008
Nuclear Power Generation in South Africa - October 2008
Mining Equipment in Australia - October 2008
Dental Equipment in Jordan - October 2008
Manufacturing Software – CAD/CAM in India - October 2008
Agriculture, Fertilizer, Food and Grocery Retail in Egypt - October 2008
Aircraft and Parts in Australia - October 2008
 

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